Trade out the turkey - Part I

Updated: 3 days ago

A trio of alternatives to turkey at Thanksgiving


now for something completely different at Thanksgiving

Holidays are about food for us, which is why Thanksgiving has always been a favorite. Historically, it has been the only time of year that we roast a turkey. And a decade ago I discovered brining as a means to facilitate an aromatic and succulent turkey.


turkey brining in a buttermilk and spice bath

I came across a buttermilk brine recipe some years back that has become our preferred brining method. There are about a dozen spices/ingredients that get boiled down and then added to a few quarts of buttermilk. I have no idea where I sourced it from, but it facilitates an extremely moist bird.


The past couple of years, however, have been quiet Thanksgivings for my wife and me. So having a big turkey makes no sense – I usually have had my fill after a couple days of turkey sandwiches. So this past year we decided to switch to a smaller bird – Cornish game hens.


cornish game hens ready to go on the ceramic cooker

The hens are brined overnight in the same buttermilk brine recipe and then grilled on the ceramic cooker very simply, with only lemon and thyme in the cavity. The roasting time is less than an hour and the brine produced a succulent and flavorful hen. We served the whole bird on the plate with two traditional sides of homemade maple cranberry sauce (ingredients discussed below) and creamed spinach.


this may become the new Thanksgiving tradition

We have considered tea smoked duck breasts as an alternative, as well. I definitely recall where this recipe came from – another product of the Williams Sonoma "Grilling" cookbook.


smoked duck breasts

These duck breasts are first seared to render the fat, then smoked over a low temperature on the ceramic cooker. We prefer our duck meat on the rare side, so the smoking time isn’t very long. The dish shown above involved a brining paste of earl grey tea leaves, star anise, red pepper flakes, orange zest and juice, soy sauce, cinnamon, salt and a dash of vinegar.


This year we will likely turn to venison medallions pan seared in butter, also on the rare side, and served with a perfect complement of homemade maple cranberry sauce. The sauce is dead easy, consisting of a 16 ounce bag of cranberries, half cup of maple syrup and half cup of brown sugar boiled until the berries pop. This is finished by grating the zest of one orange over top.


venison and cranberries are a perfect match


Happy Thanksgiving and bon appétit!

48 views1 comment